Clan Cranstoun Badge, Scottish Clan Buchanan, Lowland Clan

Clan Cranstoun Badge, Scottish Clan Buchanan, Lowland Clan

SKU: CLAN0252

Clan Cranstoun is a Lowland family. The name Cranstoun is of territorial origin and comes from the lands and barony of Cranstoun in Midlothian. The lands might have been named after the Anglo-Saxon for place of the crane. A crane being a bird which appears on both the shield and crest of the Clan Cranstoun. In 1296 Hugh de Cranstoun appears on the Ragman Rolls swearing fealty to Edward I of England. David II of Scotland granted a charter to Thomas de Cranston for all the lands of Cranston.

The Clan Cranstoun prospered up to the late 16th century when they became involved in the volatile political situation of the time. In 1592 Thomas and John Cranstoun, both relatives of the chiefly family were among those accused of treason for assisting Francis Stewart, 5th Earl of Bothwell in his attack on Holyrood Palace. During the Civil War, the third Lord Cranstoun was captured at the Battle of Worcester in 1651. He was kept prisoner in the Tower of London where he languished, and his estates were sequestrated apart from a small portion that his wife and four children were allowed to keep.

William Cranstoun, the fifth Lord Cranstoun sat in the last Scottish Parliament and supported the Treaty of Union. One of his descendants, George Cranstoun, was an eminent lawyer and judge, who became an advocate and Dean of the Faculty of Advocates in 1823. He was also a friend of Walter Scott who he had studied with at the University of Edinburgh.
James Cranstoun, 8th Lord Cranstoun was a distinguished officer of the Royal Navy who commanded HMS Bellerophon (1786) and was involved in a battle where seven British ships defeated an entire French fleet in June 1795. He died of lead poisoning in 1796 and the peerage became extinct in 1813.

In 1950 Lieutenant Colonel Alastair Cranstoun of Corehouse was recognized as chief of Clan Cranstoun. He died in 1990. The current chief succeeded his uncle, who died with no issue. The family is still predominantly based in Midlothian.


Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. The piece is hand painted with dye oxide, specifically for metal. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

  • Production Process

    Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. The piece is hand painted with dye oxide, specifically for metal. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

$50.00Price