Clan Kerr Badge, Scottish Clan, Border Reiver Clan

Clan Kerr Badge, Scottish Clan, Border Reiver Clan

SKU: CLAN0066

Clan Kerr is a Scottish clan whose origins lie in the Scottish Borders. During the Middle Ages, it was one of the prominent border reiver clans along the present-day Anglo-Scottish border and played an important role in the history of the Border country of Scotland.

The two main branches of the Clan Kerr, the Kerrs of Ferniehurst and the Kerrs of Cessford, often feuded with each other. However, both Andrew Kerr of Ferniehurst and Andrew Kerr of Cessford were made Wardens of the Middle Marches, the first in 1502 and the latter after the Battle of Flodden in 1513. After Flodden, some of the Liddesdale clans put themselves under the Kerr of Ferniehurst's protection, but, in 1523, his castle was taken by the English after a protracted defense.

The Clan Kerr feuded in particular with the Clan Scott. The feud began on 25 July 1526, when Sir Walter Scott of Buccleuch launched an attack (the Battle of Melrose) to rescue the young James V of Scotland who was being held by the Douglas Earl of Angus at Darnick just west of Melrose, and in the ensuing fight Kerr of Cessford was killed. The Kerrs, however, took their time and, in 1552, they set upon Sir Walter Scott on Edinburgh High Street and killed him. The feud came to an end when Sir Thomas Kerr of Ferniehurst married Janet Scott who was the sister of the tenth Scott Laird of Buccleuch.

During the Jacobite rising of 1745, the Clan Kerr supported the British government. At the Battle of Culloden in 1746, Lord Kerr's great nephew, Lord Robert Kerr (son of William Kerr, 3rd Marquis of Lothian), who was Captain of the grenadiers in Barrell's regiment, received the first charging Cameron on the point of his Spontoon, but a second cut him through the head to chin. He has the dubious distinction of being the only person of high rank killed on the government side. The eldest of the brothers, Mark, Lord Kerr, later the fourth Marquess of Lothian, commanded three squadrons of government cavalry at the Battle of Culloden and survived to serve under the Duke of Cumberland in France in 1758.

The Kerrs have typically been associated with left-handedness, and some of their buildings, such as Ferniehurst Castle, have turnpike stairs explicitly designed with this in mind.

Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. A patina has been applied giving the metal that aged look. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

  • Production Process

    Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. A patina has been applied giving the metal that aged look. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

$40.00Price