Clan Kinninmont Badge

Clan Kinninmont Badge

SKU: CLAN0217

Clan Kinninmont is a Scottish clan. The clan does not have a chief. The clan name Kinninmont is derived from the lands of Kinninmonth in Fife, Scotland. 

In the years between 1189 and 1199, Odo, seneschal to the Bishop of St Andrews, received a charter for these lands from William I of Scotland. An 1841 publication dealing with the charters on the archbishopric of St Andrews states that the charter granted by John, son of Adam, son of Odo is not recorded. The publication also states that John's "original deed of consent, executed at the same time, and before the same witnesses with the charter of his father, is still extanct; and on his seal we find the family name for the first time: S’Iohannis de Kinimmund". 

William de Kynemuthe's name appears on the Ragman Roll, which records the names of Scots nobles who submitted to Edward I of England in 1296. In 1329 Alexander de Kininmund became Bishop of Aberdeen. Another Alexander de Kininmund became Archdeacon of Aberdeen in 1352. James Kynimond of that Ilk asserted his hereditary right to the offices of baillie, steward and marischal of St Andrews, in 1438. The direct line of Kininmonts of that Ilk (the chiefly line) came to an end with the marriage of the one heiress to Murray of Melgund. Sir William Kininmouth was a distinguished twentieth-century Scottish architect.

Alexander de Kininmund (died 1344) was a 14th-century Scottish churchman. The first mention of Alexander occurs when, as a canon of Dunkeld he is one of three ambassadors sent by King Robert I of Scotland to Avignon in 1320. The purpose of this embassy was to present a letter to Pope John XXII known as the Declaration of Arbroath. As a papal chaplain and lawyer, he was well qualified to argue the Scottish cause, and Barrow makes a strong case that he was, in fact the author of the document.

Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. The piece is hand painted with dye oxide, specifically for metal. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

  • Production Process

    Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. The piece is hand painted with dye oxide, specifically for metal. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

$50.00Price