Clan MacEwen Badge, Scottish Clan MacEwan, Highland Clan

Clan MacEwen Badge, Scottish Clan MacEwan, Highland Clan

SKU: CLAN0206

Clan MacEwen
The name "MacEwen" comes from one of the many anglicised spellings of the Scottish Gaelic name, MacEòghainn, which means, "son of Eòghann", and could have arisen independently at different times throughout history.

Clan Ewen of Otter - The MacEwen lords of Otter appear sporadically in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century records. The genealogy of the clan is recorded in MS 1467, now held by the National Library of Scotland. The last MacEwen of Otter was Swene MacEwen, on whose death in 1493 the barony passed into Campbell overlordship. 

It is frequently stated that an Act of Parliament of 1602 lists MacEwens beside MacLachlans and McNeils, as vassals of the Earl of Argyll and answerable to him for their behaviour. Highland lore among Clan MacLachlan is that after Sween MacEwen's death, Clan MacLachlan offered to serve in the role as protectorate to their MacEwen cousins, as the two clans have historically been allies and relatives. In this spirit, Clan Maclachlan traditionally extends membership to MacEwens.
According to the 19th-century historian James Logan, in General Wade's statement of the Highland forces engaged in the Jacobite rising of 1715, the MacEwens of the Isle of Skye were recorded to have summoned 150 men.

As of 2020, members of the Clan MacEwen Society, UK have elected a Commander, Sir John McEwen, 5th Baronet of Marchmont and Bardrochat, who is line to become the first Chief since the death of Swene MacEwen, in 1493. Sir John the 5th inherits his Baronet title from his grandfather, Sir John McEwen, 1st Baronet, for whom the modern McEwen Baronet title was created by the Queen of England in 1953

MacEwens in Galloway - There have been MacEwens in Galloway since 1331, when one Patrick McEwyn was Provost of Wigtown. According to tradition, these McEwens fought alongside the Sheriff of Wigtown's clan, the Agnews of Lochnaw, against the Black Douglas in a feud over the Sheriffdom of Galloway in the middle of the fifteenth century.

MacEwens of MacDougall - Many MacEwens still preserve a tradition of descent from Clan MacDougall, and a MacEwen sept has been acknowledged by the MacDougall chiefs. It is known that MacEwan of Muckley was descended from Ewen Mor MacDougall, brother of the MacDougall of Lorne. MacEwens in the area of Perthshire and Loch Tay were therefore considered to be a part of Clan MacDougall.

MacEwens of Clan Cameron - During the sixteenth century, a group of Camerons were also known as 'Clan Ewyne'. The leader of this clan was Donald Mac Ewen Vic Ewen Cameron of Erracht who was killed in 1570, and his followers took the MacEwen name. The Gaelic name for this sept is Sliochd Eoghain 'ic Eoghain. MacEwens who took part in the Moyness Raid of 1598 were members of this clan.

MacEwan bardic family - The MacEwan bardic family was prominent learned kindred that practiced classical Gaelic poetry. The family served the MacDougalls of Lorne, and later the Campbells of Argyll. The MacEwans, like other prominent bardic families employed by Scottish lords, were likely of Irish origin. 


Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. The piece is hand painted with dye oxide, specifically for metal. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

  • Production Process

    Each item begins as a piece of bronze sheet metal.  After a pattern is transferred to the metal, the piece is etched in a salt-water solution.  Each piece is hand cut, sanded, and polished. The pin back is soldered on. The piece is hand painted with dye oxide, specifically for metal. A clear polymer coating is applied to the face of the badge.

$50.00Price